A Winter To Remember: The Epic Snowstorms Of the 18-19 Season

We'll all look back at this ski season and remember how plentiful snow ended up being

The hope every ski season is that there is sufficient snow to go around for all of us to enjoy. Most resorts, if not all of them, now have snowmaking machines that enable them to maintain the terrain on top of natural snow. And they become even more important when snow (unfortunately) isn’t in abundance some years.

Luckily during the 2018-2019 ski season, resorts across North America have had a pretty impressive year. It set up the season to be one to remember out West. Especially because some of the snowfall broke pretty impressive records. Even resorts that are notoriously known for have deep stashes and even deeper powder saw incredible numbers before March hit (which is when the snow usually really falls!). Let’s take a look at some of the resorts that were affected by the incredibly intense winter.

 

Mammoth Mountain

 

mammoth got hit pretty epically during the snowstorms of 2018-2019This resort didn’t earn its name for any old reason. There are more than 3,400 acres of skiable terrain and its normal annual snowfall is 400+. Before February, it already saw 446” of snow and 15 ‘ in one month alone. Within 4 days the resort also saw 7’  They are now facing another storm within the week and will likely see a few more feet fall during that time. It’s safe to say that everyone will remember how the storms affected the area for years to come.

 

Mt. Baker

 

Not surprisingly, the west cost ski resorts were hit hard with the storms that pushed through. They’ve already seen 339” of snowfall which of course is good news for skiers and the resort. The area will be able to stay open a little longer and there’ll be even more carves to turn.

 

Brighton

 

brighton was just one of many resorts that got way more snow than they bargained for during the snowstorms in 2018-2019Brighton Ski Resort in Utah typically sees 500″ by the end of their season and due to the snow storms already saw 394″ 2 weeks into February 2019. If that’s any indication into what the rest of the forecast looks like, then guests will have a lot to look forward to well past March and into April. This resort does usually see great YTD snow totals but now the stashes are going to be even deeper than before

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Breckenridge

 

compared to the last two years the 2018-2019 ski season was epic because of the snowstorms that rolled throughWhile Breckenridge didn’t necessarily get hit the hardest with snowfall, the Rocky Mountains have also been visited by storms from December 2018-February 2019. Compared to the last two years at Breckenridge (both in 2017 and 2018) it’s a sizable jump in how much snow that made a grand appearance. People both local and from out-of-state have been reaping the rewards from the increase in snow, bringing in a healthy amount of visitors every weekend. You could say business is certainly booming at this and other locations across the U.S.!

 

Arapahoe Basin

 

mt. baker was just one of the many resorts to hit incredibly high snow yields for the season thanks to the snowstormsArapahoe Basin also may not have gotten the most snowfall. But like many resorts in Colorado, they’ve been enjoying and feeling the benefits of all the extra powder. Similar to Breckenridge, this resort got handed an outstanding snow card it typically doesn’t see. So far, the resort has seen 133″ already. From November 2017-December 2018 the total came out to be 235″. When you look at the big picture like that it’s very telling; an entire year almost equals what the area got in a few months!

It’s incredible to see what the winter has brought for the 2018-2019 ski season. Over the next few years, it will be hard to tell if this same pattern will occur. Even if it does, the snowfall may not happen at such a rapid pace and could be spread more evenly rather than major storms every few weeks. Regardless of what happens, people are going to happily reminisce this year and what amazing ski adventures it brought them.

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